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MY PRIORITIES



Priorities!  Values!  Perceptions!  How important! How inextricably interwoven into the fabric of our lives.  So much living done without a consciousness of our priorities, our values and our perceptions. The uniqueness of our personalities consist of this incredible mix of priorities, values and perceptions, which we're always testing, challenging, conditioning, destructuring, restructuring, rearranging.  If too static, we cease to adapt our priorities, values and perceptions.  We stagnate in growth and cease to learn.  To learn is to be willing to change priorities, values and perceptions.



Priorities: to read, study, research write and lecture



to engage in physical activity each day to enjoy each day some pleasant social acativity that I enjoy with those whose company I take delight in and who take delight in mine 



to live each day fully, to be fully alive; to be alive mentally -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive, to be alive emotionally -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive, to be alive physically --lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive; to be alive socially --lively, alert, healthy, active, and responsive.



to engage each day in some creative activity -- whether writing, music, entertianing, playing.



to be alive spiritually -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive.



These are my priorities for the moment.  I'm testing them and will discover what evelopes.  For me, these constitute a great improvement in my life and are contributing a richness and fullness to my life that was hitherto lacking. 





MAGING AND CONCEPT THERAPY





imagery, language, abstract/concrete, psychology, concepts

reference: john benjafield, an historicodevelopmental aspect of imagery. canadian journal of behavioral science, 16(3), 1984, 175-180.

> individuals seem to understand concepts referring to physical events, which are relatively concrete, before they understand concepts refering to psychological events, which are realtively abstract. 

reference: r. brown (1968). words and things, ny:free press, chapter 8.

reference: j. benjafield (1983). some psychological hypotheses concerning the evolution of constructs. british journal of psychology, 74, 47-59.

> furthermore, it seems the more concrete the word the more easily it arouses a mental image

reference: a. paivio (1971). imageray and verbal processes. ny:holt, rinehart & winston

reference: a paivio, j. yuille, & s. a. madigan (1968) concreteness, > imagery and meaningfulness values for 925 nouns. journal of experimental psychology monograph supplement. 76(1, pt.2).

appears to be a decline recently in the need to develop skills in imagery in favor of verbal and mathematical description.  "thus, whle imagery has continued to be prized as a vehicle for cretive thought and other cognitive processes (e.g., Shephard, 1978), it is still tru that, from an hisotrical viewpoint, there has been a de-esmphasis of what Langer (1949) called presentational symbolism (e.b., imagery) infavour of discursive symbolism (e.g., mathematics.  In terms of Paivio's (1971, 1979) dual-coding theory, history shows a decline in the Imagery system relative to the verbal system, although the imagery system may remain predominant for many cognitive processes."

reference: e.s. ferguson (1977). the mind's eye: non-verbal thought in technology. science, 197, 827-836.

reference: s. langer. philosophy in a new key. ny:mentor.

reference: r. n. shepard (1978) externalization of mental images and the act of creation. in b.s. randhawa & w. e. coffman (eds.), visual learning, thinking and communication. ny:academic press.

reference: a. paivio (1979) psychological processes in the comprehension of metaphor. in a. ortony (ed.), metaphor and thought, cambridge: cambridge u. press.

> words represent to consciousness something other than themselves; what they represent may tend to be easy-to-imageine or hard-to-imagine (like apple versus spree); "indeed, it seems reasonable to suppose that a culture willinvent concepts wich are concrete (and therefore high in Imagery) and broadly useful before it will generate more abstract, specialized concepts, and that this order will be similar to the order in whch concepts are qcquired by children."

reference: Benjafield, 1984, p. 179.



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF BIOFEEDBACK CLINICIANS AND IMAGERY



note that at the annual convention of the american association of biofeedback clinicians in toronto in august, 1984, one of the major research reports was entitled "uses of imagery in the healing arts".  how far ahead of his time was dr. fleet!

(reference: biofeedback clinician, newsletter of the american association of biofeedback clinicians, spring 1984)



DESCRIPTIONS OF PERSONALITY TRAITS



OR



HOW MEN AND WOMEN SEE THEMSELVES AND EACH OTHER



Source:

Gormly, Anne V. and John B. Gormly.  Changes in the way men and women view themselves and each other -- 1971-1981.  Transactional Analysis Journal, 1983, 13:104-109.



In 1981, more women tended to describe themselves as socially outgoing and uninhibity.

At the same time, more men tended to see themselves as astute in practical matters and energetic.  Fewer men, were willing to describes themselves as honest and reliable.



Both the men and the women were willing to describe the women of 1981 as ambitious.



Interestingly, men are more willing to describe themselves as energetic and honest, whereas women don't agree.



Women see themselves as more energetic and more socially outgoing than men see them.



Both men and women tend to agree today that men are ambitious; this was not so in 1971.



Men see themselves today as assertive; women don't agree.



Both men and women see men as more astute in practical matters, but more men see themselves as energetic; women are less inclined to agree.  The same applies to their being socially outgoing. 

In general, I would say in summarizing the results, that women are perceived as more competent today, and that men see themselves much more favourably than others perceive them.





IMAGES / CONCEPTS: PERSONAL





The distractions from writing are great.  I'm easily removed from what I want to do.  This morning I spent organizing my files, thinking, jotting down some ideas to be developed.  So many positive thoughts, some well-formed; others still vague yet appealing, with seeming worth, deserving further thought and searching to clarify and make more explicit.  Mostly, I keep being drawn back to philosophy -- my first love!



As of August, 1982, these have been my priorities: that each day I shall spend time studying and researching and sharing the results of my studies and research with others through the spoken and written word.



Secondly, that I shall spend time each day in physical activity, keeping myself physically fit.



Thirdly, that I shall spend time each day in social activity.  These are my priorities!





Image



My image is that my thoughts, my ideals, my concepts shall so dispose me as to desire to be of service to others, to desire wisdom above all and to desire to conduct my life along the lines of right action.  Further that every thought word and act of mine shall be completely in accord with universal law and shall so dispose me as to be completely in accord with universal law. 



This is my image and what I desire with my whole heart, mind and soul.





MY PRIORITIES



Priorities!  Values!  Perceptions!  How important! How inextricably interwoven into the fabric of our lives.  So much living done without a consciousness of our priorities, our values and our perceptions. The uniqueness of our personalities consist of this incredible mix of priorities, values and perceptions, which we're always testing, challenging, conditioning, destructuring, restructuring, rearranging.  If too static, we cease to adapt our priorities, values and perceptions.  We stagnate in growth and cease to learn.  To learn is to be willing to change priorities, values and perceptions.



Priorities: to read, study, research write and lecture



to engage in physical activity each day to enjoy each day some pleasant social acativity that I enjoy with those whose company I take delight in and who take delight in mine 



to live each day fully, to be fully alive; to be alive mentally -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive, to be alive emotionally -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive, to be alive physically --lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive; to be alive socially --lively, alert, healthy, active, and responsive.



to engage each day in some creative activity -- whether writing, music, entertianing, playing.



to be alive spiritually -- lively, alert, healthy, active, responsive.



These are my priorities for the moment.  I'm testing them and will discover what evelopes.  For me, these constitute a great improvement in my life and are contributing a richness and fullness to my life that was hitherto lacking. 











MY OFFERING







Lord, help me to be a good student and a worthy colleague.  Help me in my writing that I may share with others in a spirit of humility and generosity the fruit of my studies.  Let me be a window through which Your light may shine in the world.  Reveal to me, and through me to Your children, the mysteries of Your Creation, O Father and Lord of All. 



I long to give myself to you, my Lord and Creator. I know not whether my offering is acceptable You, Lord.  I offer You, my love, imperfect, incomplete, inconstant as it may be; it is the best I have to offer, and I offer this, my all, without reservation.  Do with me what You will. 



Lord, increase my understanding that I may do Your will and serve Your people with right thinking, right action and wisdom.  Grant me, Lord, the gift of Your love and Your light so that Your children may know Your love and serve You and one another with true love in their hearts.





NOTES TAKEN FROM AN ARTICLE ABOUT B. F. SKINNER APPEARING IN PSYCHOLOGY TODAY, SEPTEMBER, 1983



THE TITLE OF THE ARTICLE IS: ORIGINS OF A BEHAVIORIST





> FEELINGS



Skinner says this about feelings:



"...I also do not think feelings are important.  Freud is probably responsible for the current extent to which they are taken seriously" (p24).



For Skinner, behavior is a function of three things (and might be expressed algebraically as B = fx,y,z where):



x = genetic endowment



y = personal history



z = current setting (p25)





> FEAR



Skinner says he was thought to fear three things (and I can really identify with this, being more or less a product of the New England culture myself):



God

the police

what people will think (p25)





> Psychology and Behaviorism



It never occurred to me that there might be a difference between the two.  Skinner, I believe, would think of psychology as the science of behavior and behaviorism as the philosophy of that science (p32)



> A Behaviorist's Credo



"If some Mephistopheles offered me a wholly new life oncondition that all recoreds and effects of my present life be destroyed, I should refuse" (p32).



> What is a human being?



"If I am right about human behavior, an individual is onlythe way in which a speicies and a culture produce more of species and a culture.  It remains a matter of selection even when species and cultures are changed by explicit design.  The question is whether we hve reached the point at which we can accept a scientific view of human behavior and use it to solve our problems" (p33).







> Discipline



"When students are studying simply to avoid the consequences of not studying, teachers wast a lot of time maintaining order with punitive sanctions" (p26).



> Teacher Education



"Teachers need to be taught how to teach.  Teaching is the only respectable profession thathas no instructional training.  We know that there are effective methods of teaching, but these methods are not being taught in the schools of education" (p27).



"Many psychologists today seem threatened by the scientific analysis of human behavior, particularly if it leads to a technology that can be used to intervene in people's lives.  It's said there is a revolt against behaviorism.  I call it a refusal to be scientific" (p27).



"Teachers ought to demand a situation in which they can teach well.  Teacher burnout is a very real thing.  It is due primarily to teachers' realization that they're not accomplishing much.  If you show teachers how to teaxch well, and give them the material they need, including devices of some kind, it will increase the morale of the profession enormously.  And it will keep good teachers teaching" (p27).



"I firmly believe that America will be punished if it does not support the kind of behavioral science that makes good education possible.  The culture will fail, and another culture will come along to take its place" (p27).





> Creativity and Aging



"You are less likely to plagiarize yourself if you move into a new field or a new style" p28.



Much change in the behavior of older people can be attributed not simply to old age, but to "changed contingencies of reinforcement" p29.



"Our culture does not generously reinforce the behavior of old people" p29.



Quoting Cicero's De Senectute: "Old age is honored only on conditin that it defends itself, maintains its rights, is subservient to no one, and to its last breath rules over its own domain" p29.



"Many of the reinforcers in old age tend to be on a stretched variable-ratio schedule.  If your achievements as a thinker have been spaced on a favorable schedule, you will have no difficulty in remaining active even though current achievements are spaced far apart" p29.









"An appropriate measure of intellectual self-management is to organize discussions, if only in groups of two.  Find someone with similar interests.  Two heads together are better than both apart.  In talking with another person we have ideas that do not occur when we are alone at our desks.  Some of what we say may be borrowed, but the mere effect of having someone to say it to is usually conscpicuous" p29.



Watch out for flattery.  "Flattery will more often than not put you on the wrong track by reinforcing useless behavior" p29.







DR MASSEY: WHAT YOU ARE IS WHAT YOU WERE WHEN



1. Who were your heroes in the early years of your life.



2. What was your (music, books, hobbies, dress, religion) when you were in your teens?



3. Describe some significant emotional event in your life?  How did this change your values?



4. What values have been programmed in you?  List all those things, people, activities, behaviors, etc, whatever you consider right, normal, good and whatever you consider wront, deviant, bad.



5. When you were younger, what did you do for kicks?  What do you now do for kicks?



6. When you were young, what were you looking forward to that has changed?  Changed for better or worse?



7. What bugs you? annoys you? irritates you?





THE "Q" MODEL AS A SUBMODEL OF TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS





Advantages of the model



> a baseline concept of well-being



> an instrument for diagnosing and prescribing



> useful for studying sources of illness and wellness



> a diagram for integrating different psychological theories, including Freud, Erikson, Mahler, Piaget, various schools of Transactional Analysis and other Family System theories



> a possible paradigm for suggesting future research in Human Relations



The model invented by Edward Zerin.  This description of it from an article entitled "The "Q" Model by Edward Zerin, published in The Transactional Analysis Journal, Vol 14, No 1, January 1984, pp 48-67.







I want to consider this model in terms of my model of motivation.  He speaks about passive, aggressive and assertive behavior patterns.  Recall, an important question in my model is the question of what patterns do I use to get what I want, and what pattern do I display when I don't get what I want?



Here are the kinds of passive responses Zerin describes:



PASSIVE: If you won't give me what I want, then I will do without it (compliant or submissive behavior).



PASSIVE TO AGGRESSIVE: If you won't give me what I want, I will walk softly (compliant) and carry a big stick (defiant).



AGGRESSIVE:  If you won't give me what I want, I will take what I want (defiant).



AGGRESSIVE TO PASSIVE:  If you won't give me what I want, I will come on strong (defiant, but I will back down if you oppose me (compliant).



Different types of assertiveness



Each major response has a minor expression, which is the weaker and less dominant form of the major expression.



Major: I give myself what I want if you don't give it to me.

Minor: I hand No for an answer and integrate alternatives.



Major: I accept what you give me if it is what I want.

Minor: I do not accept what you give me if it is not what I want.



Major: I give you wht you want even though you ask me for it.

Minor: I ask for what I want even though you do not offer it and/or do not want to give it to me.



Major: I can handle No for an answer and itegrate alternatives.

Minor: I give myself what I want if you don't give it to me.



Major: I do not accept what you give me if it is not what I want.

Minor: I accept what you give me if it is what I want.



Major: I ask for what i want even though you do not offer it to me and/or do not want to give it to me.

Minor: I give you what you want even though you ask me for it.





WAYS IN WHICH INDIVIDUALS ALIENATE THEMSELVES FROM OTHERS





Zerin proposes five ways in which individuals, in dealing with cultural goals and the institutional means of achieving the goals of other around them, impact through the ways they cope on themselves as individuals.



SELF-ESTRANGEMENT PATTERN:



The individual accepts and complies with the goals and means established by society, and at the same time negates him/herself.



NORMALNESS PATTERN;



The individual accepts and complies with the goals of society but rejects and defies the way society goes about achieving them.  The individual insists on testing him/herself.



MEANINGLESS PATTERN:



The individual rejects and defies both the goals and the means of society, believing that s/he cannot predict the outcome nor understand the events in which s/he is engaged.  The individual becomes aggressive.



POWERLESSNESS PATTERN:



The individual rejects the goals but accepts and complies with the means.  The idnvidual believes that s/he cannot control the outcome of the events in which s/he is involved, and consequently denies him/her self and just goes along.



ISOLATION PATTERN:



The individual seeds to achieve goals and to use means which are outside the social structure in which s/he lives.  The individual rebels against society and establishes a new social structure.



[all taken from page 51]



THE TRANSFORMATION PATTERN



[THIS TOO ACCORDING TO ZERIN, P53]



AN ENTRY POINT



The individual discovers, probably by chance, that there are other ways of knowing or being which can be identified by a process of retrospection or mediation or reflection (what I call a process of reflective thinking).



EXPLORATION



Sensing something worth finding, the individual may then set out to look for ways to bring about this other way of knowing or being.  This step, when seriously taken, is important in a powerful and significant way.  The individual lets or permits this knew knowldge or behaviour to come forward.  May be a very intuitive state.



INTEGRATION



Recognizing that many old habits, ambitions and strategies are no longer appropriate to his/her new beliefs, and acknowledging what may be considered favorite methods and/or teachers, the individual not trusts his/hyer intter self.  The need for esternal validation or self-jusitfication diminshes.  Integration is experienced (but not taught).  The individual may experience a break in his/her social life while reassessing his/her responsibilities, roles and direction.  The individual rethings his/her leadership, power and the surrounding pecking order rather than continuing to engage in old behavior patterns, egotism or timidity.  At the same time, self-questioning may go so far as to become a kind of self-torturing. 



CONSPIRACY



Having discovered that the new ways of knowing and behaving work in his/her own life and seem to work for others, also discovers other sources of power for self-fulfillment and for service to enable but not to impose the healing and transforming of society.



TRANSFORMATION



The individual transforms his/her current level of the entry point, exploration, itengration and conspiracy by entering a new level of existence brought on either by a new paradigm shift through acquiring new information or a result of a trauma, both of which were unpredictable.  The new `transformation paradigm cans for a recycling of entry point, exploration, integration, conspiracy.



The pattern may be distinguished in other terms, such as (a) a beginning, (b) an exploring, (c) an integrating, (d) making a commitment, (e) a transfforming.  The transforming process begins with an awareness of oneself, continues with a testing of values, through which one begins to make sense of his/her life, and takes his/her life into his/her own hands.









VALUES AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY



VALUES PROGRAMMING IN THE 1980'S



[THE FOLLOWING COMMENTS ARE TAKEN FROM AN ARTICLE IN THE PHI DELTA KAPPAN, APRIL 1984, BY BOV. JAMES B. HUNT,JR, ENTITLED "EDUCATION FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH; ACRITICAL INVESTMENT" PP. 538-541.]



Students need to do more than simply be able to read they must be able to analyze what they read, summarize, and interpret what they read.  The ability to write must expand to the ability to select, organize, and develop ideas.  Arithmetic competence must expand to the ability to compute, and to use basic concepts of probability and statistics.



We need not only these advanced skills, but we need also the ability to use them creatively.



This author is firmly convinced (as chairman of the Taks Force on Education for Economic Growth, sponsored by the Education Commission of the States) that "education is the key to economic growth in (the U.S.).



Good schools make for good jobs.



One solution is to call for a renewed respect for teachers and for the profession of teaching. Must improve method of recruiting, training and paying teachers.



The working conditions of teachers and the learning conditions of students must improve.



Classrooms must be orderly places to teach in which teachers are free to teach, unburdened by administrative trivia, (and free from the bullying and harrassment of students).



Teachers must be given the opportunity to improve and grow professionqally.

The best teachers must be allowed to spend most of their time teaching and working with young people.



The academic experience must be more rigorous, with explicit requirement regarding discipline, attendance, homework and grades.



Need measures of quality control in our schools; ways to measure the effectiveness of teachers and improve the process whereby they are certified.

Student progress must be regularly monitored through periodic achievement testing.

Both teachers and students must realize that better performance is expected of them.







MOTIVATION



WANTS



MEASURING VALUES: WILL IT PAY?



What's the pay-off, if I do this thing that I want to do?  How do you measure how much someone values something?  By the amount of money they are willing to spend for it?  By the amount of time they are willing to spend pursuing that thing?  By the amount of discomfort, inconvenience, pain and sacrifice they are will to endure for it?  By the amount or degree of rejection, humiliation, ridicule, isolation they are willing to experience to have what they want?



Do you want possessions?  Do you want character?  Do you want self-improvement?  Do you want freedom?  Do you want security?  How badly do you want any of these things?  How far are you willing to go to get any of them? 



What you mean by "character?" How do you tell if someone has "character?"



WORLD EVENTS TIMETABLE



1895 - 1905





X-RAYS DISCOVERED

RADIO INVENTED

FREUD'S THEORY PUBLISHED

MOVIE CAMERA INVENTED

IDEA OF ROCKET PROPULSION PUBLISHED

MACHINE FOR LIQUIFYING AIR INVENTED

HELIUM DISCOVERED

ELECTRICAL WAVES FIRST DETECTED MAGNETICALLY

RADIOACTIVITY DISCOVERED

RADIUM DISCOVERED

ALPHA, BETA WAVES DISCOVERED

FIRST MAGNETIC RECORDING OF SOUND

RADON DISCOVERED

QUANTUM THEORY PUBLISHED

REVOLVER MANUFACTURED

VOICE TRANSMITTED VIA RADIO WAVES

MINOAN CULTURE DISCOVERED

CENTURY OF ELECTRICITY BEGINS

LAWS OF RADIATION PUBLISHED

HORMONE ADRENALIN ISOLATED

FIRST TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGE SENT

FIRST MOTOR DRIVEN BIKES

FIRST MERCEDES CAR

THIRD LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS PUBLISHED

FIRST STUDY OF PITUITARY BODY PUBLISHED

HORMONE SECRETIN DISCOVERED

ARC GENERATOR DISCOVERED

PANCHROMATIC PLATE INVENTED (COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY)

FIRST SUCCESSFUL AIRPLANE

ULTRAMICROSCOPE INVENTED

UNIVERSITIES OF MANCHESTER AND LIVERPOOL FOUNDED

ELECTROCARDIOGRAPH INVENTED

GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY PUBLISHED

FIRST PRACTICAL PHOTOELECTRIC CELL

FIRST ULTRAVIOLET LAMP

YELLOW FEVER CONQUERED

ROLSS-ROYCE FOUNDED

FIRST PHOTO TRANSMITTED TELLEGRAPHICALLY

FIRST MARCONI (RADIO) TUBES USED

SILICONES DISCOVERED

FIRST UNDERWATER RAILROAD TUNNEL CONSTRUCTED

EINSTEIN THEORY OF RELATIVITY PUBLISHED: LAW OF MASS-ENERGY EQUIVALENCE, BROWNIAN THEORY OF MOTION, PHOTON THEORY OF LIGHT

FREUD'S THEORY OF SEX PUBLISHED

RAYON FIRST MANUFACTURED



GILLETTE INVENTS SAFETY RAZOR

FIRST PRO FOOTBALL GAME PLAYED

FIRST US OPEN GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYED

FIRST MODERN OLYMPICS

FIRST ALPINE SKI SCHOOL OPENS

GOLD RUSH

FIRST FLASH PHOTOGRAPHS

PARIS SUBWAY OPENED



US WINS 8 OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALS

US STEEL ORGANIZED

OIL DRILLING BEGINS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

BOXING BECOMES LEGAL SPORT IN ENGLAND

FIRST BRITISH SUBMARINE LAUNCHED

FIRST LEGAL SPEED LIMIT SET AT 20

FIRST MOTORIZED TAXIS IN ENGLAND

FORD MOTOR FOUNDED

FIRST COAST TO COAST CAR TRIP ACROSS US

FIRST TEDDY BEARS

FIRST BICYCLE RACE IN FRANCE

FIRST BASEBALL WORLD SERIES

FIRST LAW LIMITING WORK DAY TO 10 HOURS

FIRST LICENCE ISSUED FOR SERVING DRINKS IN A BAR IN ENGLAND

NY SUBWAY OPENED

FIRST TIME A WOMAN ARRESTED FOR SMOKING IN PUBLIC

FIRST PHONOGRAPH RECORD COMPANY FOUNDED

FIRST MOTOR BUSSES USED

FIRST NEON SIGN

ROTARY CLUB FOUNDED





SUCCESS MOTIVATION - TIPS



Source: James Gray, columnest, Toronto Star, Sunday, January 8, 1984, p. B4





Creativity and enthusiasm important for success. Trait that people at Hallmark Cards are wanting in their applicants and employees.  Out of 800 applicants, only 300 get interviews and only 30 of these get second interviews.  From these 30, only 10 are offered a sales position.



Employers can afford to be highly selective in today's intensely competitive employment market.



Usually applicants have a bachelors degree (Arts or Commerce), or high school and several years of experience in a people-related business.



Successful candidates are likely to have:

- attached a personal letter with the application form

- typed the application form

- make things easy to read and neatness counts for much

- enclosed a photograph of themselves

- a well-groomed appearance

Also important to be:

- enthusiastic

- creative

- friendly, yet professional in greeting others

- firm in handshake

- in straight eye-to-eye contact

- honest

- express a sense of commitment to what you're doing





Once selected, to keep a position, be:

- positive

- productive

- patient



TELEVISION AND VALUES



Q: How much influence does TV have on what people who watch it believe and do?



A: No research has convinced anyone that TV has power to persuade its viewers.



Q: How much time do most people who watch TV regularly spend watching it?



A: About six hours or more a day.



Q: What is the educational value of TV for encouraging greater self-knowledge, better health and constructive changes in basic values, attitudes and behavior? (question asked by S.J. Ball-Rokeach, M. Rokeach and J.W. Grube in an article entitled "The Great American Values Test," in Psychology Today, November, 1984, pp. 34+).



A-l:



Beauty is ranked 7th in importance by eleven-year-olds; and 14th by fifteen-year-olds; and 17th by adults.  What happens in the transition from ll years to adulthood to bring about this change in values?  Does this explain a willingness to put up with pollution and ugliness?  What happens when our desire for beauty conflicts with our desire for material comfort?

People who value comfort highly seem to be less concerned about environmental issues.



ARE YOUR VALUES IN ORDER?



To compare your value system with that of others, rank the values in order of their importance as guiding principles in your life, from most important (1) to least important (18).



_____ A Comfortable Life



_____ An Exciting Life



_____ A Sense of Accomplishment



_____ A World at Peace



_____ A World of Beauty



_____ Equality



_____ Family Security



_____ Freedom



_____ Happiness



_____ Inner Harmony



_____ Mature Love



_____ National Security



_____ Pleasure



_____ Salvation



_____ Self-Respect



_____ Social Recognition



_____ True Friendship



_____ Wisdom





Those who watched a special program designed to increase concern about environmental issues, racism and sexism had some impact on getting people pro-environment, antiracism and antisexism.





ARE YOUR VALUES IN ORDER?



To compare your value system with that of others, rank the values in order of their importance as guiding principles in your life, from most important (1) to least important (18).



__ 8___ A Comfortable Life



_ 17___ An Exciting Life



___7 __ A Sense of Accomplishment



___2 __ A World at Peace



__15___ A World of Beauty



__12___ Equality



___1 __ Family Security



___3 __ Freedom



___5 __ Happiness



__11___ Inner Harmony



__14___ Mature Love



__13___ National Security



__16___ Pleasure



__10___ Salvation



___4 __ Self-Respect



__18___ Social Recognition



__ 9___ True Friendship



___6 __ Wisdom





A-2: "A single 30-minute exposure to TV can significantly later basic beliefs, related attitudes and behavior oflarge numbers of people for at least several months."



A-3: In one study of President Reagan's speeches, he used the words `freedom' and `liberty' 44 times and he used the word `equality' only once.



A-4: It would seem from one study of the use of language by people of different political persuasions that socialists rank both freedom and equality high among their values; fascists rank both very low; communists rank equality very high, but freedom very low; conservatives place high value on freedom and a very low value on equality.







ARE YOUR VALUES IN ORDER?



To compare your value system with that of others, rank the values in order of their importance as guiding principles in your life, from most important (1) to least important (18).



_____ A Comfortable Life



_____ An Exciting Life



_____ A Sense of Accomplishment



_____ A World at Peace



_____ A World of Beauty



_____ Equality



_____ Family Security



_____ Freedom



_____ Happiness



_____ Inner Harmony



_____ Mature Love



_____ National Security



_____ Pleasure



_____ Salvation



_____ Self-Respect



_____ Social Recognition



_____ True Friendship



_____ Wisdom









ARE YOUR VALUES IN ORDER?



To compare your value system with that of others, rank the values in order of their importance as guiding principles in your life, from most important (1) to least important (18).



__ 8___ A Comfortable Life



_ 17___ An Exciting Life



___7 __ A Sense of Accomplishment



___2 __ A World at Peace



__15___ A World of Beauty



__12___ Equality



___1 __ Family Security



___3 __ Freedom



___5 __ Happiness



__11___ Inner Harmony



__14___ Mature Love



__13___ National Security



__16___ Pleasure



__10___ Salvation



___4 __ Self-Respect



__18___ Social Recognition



__ 9___ True Friendship



___6 __ Wisdom





PSYCHOLOGICAL MODELING:  THE DIMENSIONS OF



HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS





VALUES PROGRAMMING



CLAUDE BRODEUR, PH.D.



I have written here my thoughts as I reflected upon videotapes I watched which were recorded talks by Dr. Massey.  These talks were entitled, "Who You Are Is What You Were When," and "What You Are Is Not Necessarily What You Will Be," respectively.





A BUYER BY ANY OTHER NAME IS STILL A BUYER



At one time a buyer was called a "customer", someone for whom something was made to his or her specifications and for his or her particular use.  Products were customized for the buyer, and were generally intended to last a long time, sometimes being handed down from one generation to another for many, many decades.

Then some time later the customer began to be called a "consumer".  Things were made, not to last for generations, but to be consumed, to be used for a period, discarded and then replaced.  This seemed a better way to run an economy.  It made for the production of more goods, hence more work, hence more consumption of goods, which required more production, and more jobs for everyone.

With the widespread growth of high technology industry, we are beginning to develop a different perception of the buyer.  The buyer is perceived as an "end user".  The object is to make the products of high tech "user friendly".  They have to be easy to use and continually upgradable.  Computer programs, unlike textbooks, can be updated, sometimes at no cost to the purchaser and sometimes at a nominal charge only.  The buyer does not purchase a finished product, but a product which is continually being refined, improved and updated as the technological research and development keeps advancing, oftentimes in a matter not of decades, or a few years, but a few months.





THE NEW HEROES





High technology has spawned new Olympian gods.  High on Mount Olympus are the creators and operators of the computer and all the little third, fourth and nth generations of computerites.  We might call them the high techies, competitors of computer land.



Note what's happened.  High tech is the new religious of trade and commerce; it sits on the throne of prestige and power.  Modern industrial man is its servant.  Every new religion seems to develop a new language.  The new language is computerese.

 









The children of high tech are the offspring of a marriage between the research lab and the industrial plant, between the research scientist and the new technician-laborer.  The creatures involved in this marriage appeared most noticeably on the scene at the turn of the twentieth century and had their rites of passage during World War II.



You can see this new marriage reflected in the evening TV movies.  The classical battles between good and evil are waged on TV weekly before audiences of millions.  But notice!  The weapons of war are no longer the swore, the bullet, gun powder, atomic fission.  The new "weapon" is the cursor of the microcomputer, endowed with the power of life and the ability to transform itself into human form, or any other form imaginable.  



The "cursor" is the "spirit" made manifest among us as "automan".  First of all, notice that automan is a man, that he is pure energy who can manifest at any place, at any time and in any animal form he chooses.  He is vulnerable only when absent too long from the source of his energy, the mythical "father" of his being, the Host Computer.  This source supposedly has unbounded energy, which comes from we know not where and is generated we know not how.  I imagine, if we extended the likeness far enough, we could draw interesting further parallels between "utoman" and the "the christ" as archetype.



Take a careful look at the other heroes of TV programming in the 80's, specifically starting in the fall of 1983.  Besides automan, other heroes are Captain Hawk with airwolf, and the knight rider with his computerized buddy, a sleek black transam. 

The "heroes" are all male, in their 30's and 40's.  They are guided in their doing their "duty" for mankind, God and country by men older than themselves, usually in their 50's and 60's.  These youthful, handsome looking heroes have strength, stamina, daring; they are altruistic and obedient to their superiors.  The older men are depicted as men of authority, wisdom, and leadership.  They always seem to know what's good and right.  They are impeccable in character, unromantic, dispassionate, objective, cool, formal, unemotional and asexual.  They act in ways that most children naively fantasize about their parents.  After all, we can't believe that our heroes - and heroines - are so ordinary as to have indulged themselves sexually.  After all they are above that kine of thing.  They have more important things to do, like take care of us and make the world a safe place for us.



Also, note the appearance of an archetypal messiah in these TV episodes. The heroes are out to save the world, to save humans from destroying each other.  They are fighting the bad guys, usually portrayed as evil, corrupt and totally self-serving. 





Anyone who doesn't think, act, and believe the same way as the heroes and heroines is by that very fact evil.  God guys and gals stand for freedom, democracy, private enterprise, patriotism, good citizenship, family, hard work, faithfulness and fair play.

The new heroes are equipped with magic "weapons" made to appear indestructable, eternally self-renewing and self-updating.  They give the appearance of being invulnerable and everlasting. But we don't seem to like our gods that way.  So we create our god's with a secret "achilles" heel, as in one episode of airwolf where a bullet shot through the narrow barrel of an intake tube blows to smithereens a replica airwolf that served as an archetypical "antichrist".  We have to keep our gods vulnerable in case they turn evil. 



THE NEW ROAD TO SALVATION



Back in the 50's, in the post-war world, education became the highest priority of most governments.  Lavish amounts of money were spent on mass education.  Colleges and universities multiplied like never before in North America, and in Japan.  Students in unprecedented numbers entered into institutions of post-

secondary education.  Education was going to solve all the world's ills.  But it didn't.



In fact, education itself, more specifically the students, became part of the problem. The students certainly didn't see themselves as a problem.  For them the problem was not religious, economic or polticial, but institutional.  Institutions were the problem, like government, religion, the military, big business.  They rebelled against what they perceived to be the dehumanizing effect these institutions appeared to have on them and on all people.  They sought to be liberated from them. 



And instead, unknowingly and unwittingly, they created a counter culture equally and in some ways more horribly dehumanizing psychologically than anything before them.  In effect, they created a war of their own, and fought it as violently and mindlessly as any war can be fought when passions run rampant and reason takes a back seat to dogma, militancy, and the mob.



What is now being hailed as the new way to salvation?  We have only to mention the recent cutbacks in education to guess that it isn't education, that's for sure.  In fact, since the 70's there has been a subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, effort to straightjacket our institutions of higher education, to bring them more under control of the public that funds them.  One way to control education is to universal accessability by putting the cost of education out of the reach of the majority of those who otherwise would academically be eligible. 









Another move is to raise academic standards by raising the average grade for admission or to raise the average needed on entrance exams.  Eventually, a student will have to be both rich and very smart to be eligible to get the benefits of a good education. 

Another attack on the educational system has been to question and to abolish tenure.  It's easy to get rid of of someone else's privileges, especially if you don't enjoy the same.  But consider the possible consequences for future generations.  Getting rid of tenure give the state more control over who can teach in our universities, and what can be taught in them.  Usually one of the first steps to tyrannical government is to remove tenure and any such privileges of anyone connected with the educational policies of the nation. 



The new saints are those who are economically productive.  Holiness is economic productivity.  People are either productive or unproductive.  The ideal is now to get fewer people doing more of the work.  If this philosophy continues to be put into practice, we may witness an increasing growth of a "union" mentality among the middle and upper middle classes in numbers unprecedented before in the history of western society. 



Most university professors are loathe to unionize.  It conjures up images of factory workers and miners and other similar occupations.  Yet, professors are finding themselves in a position where unionizing is becoming more and more attractive. 



The traditional university is changing and no one seems able to do much about it.  In fact, many of the younger professors don't even know what a so-called "traditional" university is all about.  The classics and the liberal arts are no longer as important as they were in the past.  The disciplines are categorized a little differently, the humanities and social sciences, the so-called soft disciplines, as opposed to the hard disciplines like mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, and the like.   



Then, there are those dicsciplines somewhere between the hard and soft, the professional programmes like engineering, medicine, law, dentistry, pharmacy, architecture, education and the like.



We are not even clear politically and morally about what's worth defending.  In the past we fought for our Faith, for God and country, for democracy.  But we are not all agreed today that these things are so obviously worth dying for. 



Democracy, politics and religion are not the clear-cut issues they were once thought to be.  Those who experienced the late 50' and 60's became cynical about politics, about religion, about democracy.  Now these same people are the voters. Those who were the Hippies and Yippies are now Yuppies, the Young



Urban Professionals, who want to live the good life and seem only concerned about themselves and guaranteeing their own well-

being, as they conceive it.  They have long forgotten about the causes they championed in the 60's, about the poor, the dispossessed, the oppressed minorities.  So long, as they are no longer among the oppressed and are now a part of the extablishment, they are not interested in campaigning for causes other than those related to their own self-interest.  Gone is their idealism.



They are not yet senior citizens, nor unemployed.  Aging and unemployment are issues are from their comfortable urbanite professional ambitions.  The present social mix among the voting population is creating special problems for politicians, who are groping for issues to peddle in their election campaigns.  The voters are jaded. 





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